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VIDEO: 65 Unique Ways to Open a Bottle of Beer

Have you ever found yourself in the situation where you have beer, but no way to open it? Of course you have.. who hasn’t? A few weeks back, I found myself stuck in this exact situation. I checked into a hotel with a six pack, but didn’t realize until later that I didn’t have a bottle opener with me. Of course, I wasn’t about to let that stop me. Due to my chronic case of laziness, I wasn’t about to make another trip to the store. With some quick thinking and a little bit of engineering, I was able to get it open using the headboard and a towel.

The video below shows some very unique ways that one group of guys opened their beer (and also wasted a ton of beer in the process).
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Win up to $25,000 in the Kegerator.com Kickoff Pick’em League

Kegerator Kickoff Pick'em League

We are very excited to announce the first annual Kegerator.com Kickoff Pick’em league! This public pick’em league is 100% free and gives you the opportunity to win all sorts of prizes, as well as $25,000!

How it works:

Sign up for the pick’em league by following this link.

Every week, before the games start, you will log into your account and enter who you think will win the match-up. The top three players of the week will be entered into a monthly drawing for a chance to win a mini-kegerator. At the end of the season, all of the top weekly winners throughout the entire season will be placed into a random drawing for the MVP prize package.

The beauty of this contest, is no matter when you join the league, you still have an opportunity to win the grand prize! Do you have what it takes to win?

Winners will be notified by email. Prizes are as follows:
  • Monthly: There will be one winner each month. The contestant with the most points accumulated in the weekly contest will be entered into a drawing for a Mini-Kegerator every month.
  • Postseason MVP: There will be one postseason winner. The top 3 point earners for each week, throughout the entire season, will be placed in a random draw for the following: Dual Tap Home Brew Keg, Home Brew Kit, Beer Glasses (set of 4)
  • Grand Prize: There will be one grand prize winner. Each week the top point earner will be asked to pick the half time and final score of the 2 Monday night teams. If someone picks the exact scores, they will win $25,000!
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4 Types of Healthy Beer (And the Benefits of Drinking Them)

Healthy Beer

The average American male drinks approximately 23 gallons of beer per year, which creates a national demand of approximately 200 million barrels. Of course, since you’re on a beer blog right now reading this, it’s probably a safe bet that you drink a slightly higher than average amount of beer per year.

No matter how much you drink, there’s no denying that beer’s popularity continues to soar high. As such, so has the desire to drink a beer that won’t adversely affect your health. Past studies have suggested that the moderate consumption of beer can have some health benefits associated with it. While the term moderation may be defined differently by different people, the truth of the matter is that there are some beers out there that are “healthier” than others.

With the recent announcement that Australian scientists have created a beer with electrolytes, it got us thinking. What are the healthiest beers out there? After doing some digging around, here are four types of healthy beers and their alleged health benefits.

Heart-Friendly Beer

Beer has long been known to benefit heart health. In fact, a study from 2012 found that “moderate consumption of beer is associated with lower cardiovascular risk.” Researchers concluded that the natural antioxidants, known as phenols, found in many types of beer is behind the reason why heart function improved in the participants of the study.

The highest phenol concentrations are available in brews like Yuengling Light Lager, Abita Purple Haze and Left Hand Good Juju. Yuengling provides full flavor while staying light on calories. A typical glass of Yuengling Light Lager contains approximately 99 calories, and still contains those healthy phenol benefits.

Additionally, Abita includes real raspberries to its brew, which reduces the bitter taste of some ales. The berries also add extra antioxidants to your drink, which one would presume adds to the amount of heart health benefits. Left Hand Good Juju is made with fresh ginger – a superfood that is good for the heart. Good Juju is also light on calories, but doesn’t skimp on flavor.

Gluten-Free Beer

For many Americans, staying healthy means following a diet free from grains, commonly referred to as a gluten-free diet. This is especially important for the estimated two million Americans that suffer from Celiac disease. The easiest way to treat this devastating gastrointestinal disease is to avoid gluten at every turn.

The good news is that gluten-free beers have been steadily growing in popularity over the last few years. However, depending on where you live, gluten-free beer can be somewhat tricky to find. Call your local craft beer store and inquire about their selection of gluten-free beers. Depending on whether or not they have the beer you’re looking for, it’s possible that they can special order it for you.

One delicious example of a gluten-free beer is from Lakefront Brewery, which produces a popular pale gold beer called New Grist. This beer is brewed from rice and gluten-free yeast grown on molasses. It was also the first beer to have its label approved as gluten-free.

Dogfish Head also has a popular gluten-free beer called Tweason’ale. Instead of barley, Dogfish uses a sorghum syrup base with touches of strawberries, molasses and buckwheat honey. While it’s only a seasonal brew, it’s worth a try if you come across it. Another excellent gluten-free beer is Bard’s Original Sorghum Malt Beer. Created with sorghum syrup instead of grain syrup, this beer resembles a traditional wheat ale and rivals the originals in both taste and scent.

Brain-Healthy Beer

In a happy turn of events, researchers in Boston have discovered that drinking beer may actually boost your brain health. According to a study with 3,660 participants, those that were light to moderate drinkers — less than 14 drinks per week — tended to have fewer strokes than non-drinkers. Researchers believe that this is due to alcohol having the ability to thin your blood, thus helping prevent the formation of blood clots. While more research is needed to show the extent to which beer helps, researchers did state that excessive drinking may cause atrophy of the brain. As the saying goes, everything in moderation, no matter how tasty it may be.

In addition, light consumption of beer may also help improve your mental health as well. Drinking beer in moderation is believed to help decrease anxiety and depression. Look for beers that contain plenty of nutrients like protein, Vitamin B, iron, niacin, riboflavin and magnesium. Most beers already carry these powerful ingredients along with others that help to boost your emotional state.

Of course, other studies have shown that alcoholism and excessive drinking may actually lead to depression and other related mental-illnesses, so make sure you drink responsibly. Drink with a friend who can hold you accountable to the amount of drinks you consume and encourage you to make healthy choices.

Hangover-Free Beer

Technically, this type of beer isn’t out on the market yet, at least not that we know of. But, scientists in Australia recently announced that they have added electrolytes to beer in the quest to create a hangover free beer.

Researchers claim that by adding electrolytes and reducing the amount of alcohol in beer, it will help keep you hydrated, thus ensuring that you will not get a hangover the next day. In the study, researchers from Griffith University added electrolytes to two popular, but unnamed, beers. One of which was light (2.3% ABV), and the other is something they call “full” strength (4.8% ABV). They gave the augmented beer to participants that just had a rigorous exercise, in attempt to see which type of beer would help them recover their fluids. They found that the light beer with added electrolytes was found to be the “most effective at re-hydrating” participants.

As promising as this all sounds, it must be noted that only seven people participated in this study. And those seven people were only tested on four separate occasions. Despite the obvious limitations of this research, it’s also the first study of its kind. There’s no denying that far more research is needed to confirm whether electrolytes in your beer will prevent a hangover or not.

Healthy Beer and You

It’s important to remember that despite any potential health benefits your beer may offer, there are healthier things you can put into your body. If you’re looking to lose weight, beer may not be the best thing to consume. If you just took medicine, beer may not be the best thing to consume. Despite what we want to believe, beer is not a superfood and should not be treated as such.

While all beers tend to contain at least some health benefits, some styles will provide more benefits than others. If I had to choose the healthiest type of beer, I would lean towards gluten-free. But I’m not a doctor, and this the above list of healthy beer is not a substitute for medical advice. The key thing to remember when it comes to beer, or any type of alcohol, is to drink in moderation and do so responsibly.

Have you tried any of the “health beers” we listed above? Let us know your thoughts on them in the comments below.

Click here to enter the Kegerator.com Pick'em League
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10 Types of Beer Glasses to Complement Your Beer

Every beer geek I know has their own collection of pint glasses sitting at their house. Whether they stole them from bars they’ve visited over the years or bought them online, their collection of pint glasses is always growing. But, there are many types of beer glasses besides the pint. And even then, there are a couple different styles of pint glasses. While it may be the most popular beer glass in America today, the pint wasn’t always the chosen one.

There is a wide variety of beer glassware available for you to choose from, and they each have their own unique characteristics. In fact, some glassware is designed specifically to help preserve the foam head of your beer, while others are designed to help enhance the colors of your brew. It’s important to remember that it’s more than just a glass that holds your beer; it’s a delivery mechanism that brings out the unique flavors, colors and aroma of your favorite beer. The type of glass you use has the ability to make or break your overall experience.

Let’s take a look at the most common types of beer glasses, and what they mean for you and your favorite beer.

Pint Glasses

Pint Glass

While there are multiple kinds of pint glasses, the American pint glass is probably the most common glass for beer, in the United States at least. This is the glass that you will likely be served in a bar or restaurant. The American Pint Glass, sometimes called a Shaker glass, has a simple and somewhat skinny cylindrical shape that gets wider as it goes up. This type of pint glass typically holds 16 oz. and is common to use with most type of beers, including ales, IPAs, stouts and lagers.

The English pint glass, also commonly referred to as an Imperial or Nonic glass, is shaped much like the American pint, but has a slight lip near the top. The English pint also holds 20 oz. and is usually preferred for drinking English ales and lagers.

This type of glassware is cheap to manufacture, cheap to buy and easy to drink out of. Bars love to stock the pint glass because they’re easy to clean and simple to stack. All of which is probably why it’s the go-to glassware for most beer enthusiasts.

Beer Mugs

Beer Mug

The beer mug is my personal favorite, because it’s incredibly robust, easy to use and holds a lot of beer. Common in England, Germany and the United States, this type of beer glass comes in all sizes. Its main characteristic is its wide cylindrical shape with a handle on the side. The thick glass walls helps insulate your brew to keep it cool, while the handle helps prevent your hands from inadvertently warming up your beer (or dropping it when you’ve had too many).

Sometimes beer mugs will have dimples throughout the glass. While most believe this is merely for decorative purposes, others argue that the dimples help a drinker appreciate the overall color and clarity of their beer. No matter what you believe, there’s no denying the popularity of this beer glass. They’re easy to use, strong enough to toast your friends in a hearty manner, and it holds plenty of beer!

Beer Steins

Beer Stein

The beer stein is very similar to the mug. In fact, so common that these two types of beer glasses are often confused as the same, but they are not. While they have the same shape, steins come equipped with a hinged lid and a lever for your thumb to open said lid easily. Additionally, steins are traditionally made out of a wider variety of materials, including porcelain, stoneware, pewter, silver and wood.

’Stein’ is an abbreviated form of Steinzeugkrug, the German word for stoneware jug or tankard. Historically, steins were preferred because it was widely believed the lids were more sanitary and would ultimately prevent the bubonic plague. In fact, in the early 16th century many communities throughout Europe had passed laws requiring food and beverage containers have lids.

While beer steins are still commonly used today, they are mostly regarded as ornamental or souvenir glassware amongst the majority of beer drinkers. Most people prefer the convenience of a pint glass, over the traditions of a stein.

Goblets & Chalices

Beer Goblet

Goblets are one of the larger, more extravagant types of glassware that beer drinkers come across. Unlike pint glasses that hold a specified amount of liquid, goblets can be found in a variety of sizes. Goblets can be described as having a long thick stem, with a bowl sitting on top. Chalices are another common name for goblets, as they have the same shape. Chalices usually have thicker glass walls and may be heavier. You may find some goblets and chalices even have a gold or silver rim. This is merely decorative and serves no real purpose in terms of improving the quality of beer.

Goblets and chalices are great choices for heavy, malty beers, such as Belgian ales and german bocks. This type of glassware has a wide opening that assists a beer drinker in analyzing the overall flavor profile and aromas.

Pilsner Glasses

Pilsner Glass

This type of beer glass is tall and skinny with little-to-no curvatures as it goes up. The pilsner glass is designed and used primarily for lighter beers, such as pilsners, of course.

Typically, there are a variety of sizes of pilsner glasses, but for the most part they all hold slightly less beer than a pint glass. The slender design allows drinkers to appreciate the colors and carbonation bubbles within their beer. The slightly wider top of the glass also helps retain the foam head of your beer, and bring out its true flavor profile and aromas.

This type of beer glass is incredibly popular amongst Americans and Europeans, with its popularity only growing as the years go on. They’re not only fun to drink out of, but they enhance your ability to appreciate the true taste of your beer. The only downside, is that they typically hold less beer than other types of beer glasses.

Weizen Glasses

Weizen Glass

Weizen glasses are often confused with pilsner glasses, due to their similar shape and size. The main difference between these two styles, is that the Weizen glasses have more curvature to them. Starting with a strong, narrow base, the glass has a distinctive curve to it as it goes up. This type of beer glass is much taller than a pint glass, and usually holds at least ½ a liter of beer.

Another important characteristic, weizen glasses are designed for and primarily used for wheat beers (Weizenbier). The curved lip at the top of the glass helps trap and encourage a thick foam head, allowing for you to appreciate the full aroma and flavor that comes along with wheat beers. However, be wary of the fruit that is usually served on the rim of wheat beers, especially at bars, as the acidity and juice of the fruit could destroy the foam head.

Snifters

Snifter Glass

This type of beer glassware is somewhat rare to find out in public. However, don’t let that stop you from trying it out. You may have already heard of the snifter glass, as it is usually used for tasting cognac and brandy, but many people don’t realize that it’s also great at enriching the aromatics of beer. The unique shape of the glass allows you to swirl your beer around, stirring up the volatiles which helps bring out the full aroma of your brew.

This type of glass looks kinda like the offspring of a wine glass and a goblet. It’s small with a thin stem and footer, but the large bowl on top holds plenty of liquid. Despite how much it can hold, with this type of glass you probably don’t want to fill it all the way up to the rim, as it’s typically reserved for beers with strong flavors and aromas. If you fill it up to the rim it may prohibit you from enjoying the full experience. This type of beer glass is typically used for stronger beers, such as Double IPAs and Belgian ales, and is a favorite amongst beer enthusiasts.

Tulip & Thistle Glasses

Tulip Glass

Another fun beer glass to try out is the Tulip. Designed to trap and maintain the foam head, the tulip glass helps enhance the flavor and aromatics of hoppy and malty brews. Much like the goblets and snifters, this beer glass has a small stem and footer with a unique, tulip-like bowl on top. The top rim curves outward, forming a lip that helps ensnare the foam head.

The thistle glass resembles a stretched-out version of the tulip. It has the same stumpy stem, with a bulb-like bowl, but it’s slightly taller and has less curves around the lip. The thistle glass is typically reserved and designed for Scottish Ales, as the “thistle” is Scotland’s official flower. Much like the snifter, the tulip glass is commonly used for stronger brews, such as Double IPAs, Belgian ales and barleywines. The bulb-like bowl allows you to generously swirl around your beer, releasing the full aromas. This is another type of beer glass that is a popular amongst beer geeks.

Stange Glasses

Strange Glass

The stange glass (or stangen glass) is also commonly referred to as a strange glass, stick glass, pole glass or rod glass. This type of beer glass is named this not because it’s a weird looking glass, but because “stange” is the German word for rod… and that’s exactly what it resembles. The stange glass is tall and slender, much like a “Tom Collins” glass. It’s easily the most boring looking beer glass on this list, but its use can be traced back for decades. No beer glass list is complete without the stange.

The shape of this glass is generally the same, but the size can vary. Generally, this type of beer glass will hold around 6.5 ounces, but it seems that in recent times larger versions are making their way out onto the market. This glassware is typically reserved for delicate beers, such as German Kölsch, to help intensify the flavors and aromas. The main benefit of this type of beer glass is that it has a firmer concentration of the important volatiles within the beer, allowing you to get a real sense of its flavor.

Tasting & Sampler Glasses

Beer Tasting Glass

The tasting glass, also called a sampler glass, can be found in all shapes and sizes. We add it to our list of beer glasses, because they are commonly found throughout brewery tours and pubs. Not to mention, every beer geek I know has their own special collection of tasting glasses at their home.

Taster glasses typically hold a fraction of the amount of a pint glass, ranging from 2.5 to 6 ounces of beer. They’re purposely designed this way so you can sample a beer, without becoming intoxicated. Taster glasses are also handy for sampling a couple of draft beers at your local pub, without committing yourself to the full pint. Or, if you and your buddies buy a rare, expensive brew, taster glasses are a great way to split it up and allow everyone to experience the full flavor.

What’s your favorite type of beer glass?

As you can see, there is a wide variety of beer glasses out there. Every single one of them are designed to enhance the over all experience you get from your favorite style of beer. To answer the most obvious question — Yes, the type of glass you drink your beer out of, does play a role in the overall experience you have. Despite your awesome pint glass collection, we hope that the above list has encouraged you to expand your collection to other styles of glassware. Even if you only debut your snifter once a year, just having it makes your collection all the more impressive.

So, which type of beer glass is your favorite? Let’s hear it in the comments below.

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WTF is a Margarator?

We’re always on the lookout for the next big thing in home appliances here at Kegerator.com, and one of our employees recently came across “margarators” while combing the net for interesting beverage dispensers.

Curious to find out more about this “mystery product”, we had some questions: Was it refrigerator-based like a kegerator? Can you build them into your counter space? And more importantly – is it as convenient as pouring from a keg? For example, can you purchase a large volume of already mixed margarita (like a keg of beer) for optimal serving ease?

After some more research we found that we, in fact, carry a selection of products that could be called “margarators”… So what is one? Well, a margarator is a machine used for blending and mixing frozen drinks both alcoholic and non (we call it a margarita machine). It’s different from a blender because the blades are crafted to specifically cut through ice and fruity deliciousness. And, instead of just selecting a speed, you can adjust the setting by consistency to ensure your concoctions turn out just right. Plus, the majority of “margarators” have more power than your average kitchen blender and include a built-in spout for easy pouring. It’s really a “must-have” for all margarita and frozen drink lovers.

If you’re going to get one (and you should), don’t be a fool and call it a “margarator”. Why? Because unlike a kegerator, the unit does not always chill and serve the contents (the commercial ones do, though), so naming it a “margarator” (which is seemingly synonymous with the term “kegerator”) just plain defies the logic of the name since it does not serve the same purpose of a kegerator.

We’d love to hear your thoughts on this hot topic. Do you think margarator is a fitting name for these products?

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