Fall 2011 -

Latest Articles | Page1 2 3

0

Damage Control | Schlitz & Giggles

As many of you already know, we at Schlitz & Giggles are on the verge of announcing our new beer. It is due to be introduced in late November, and production has already begun at our plant. To ensure a quality product, part of our brewing process is taping various quality assurance videos, which remain safe within our company.

However, our QA videos were unfortunately leaked to the news media outlets, showing bits and pieces of the process we used to make our mystery beer. While we wish that this source had chosen not to leak these videos, we figured it would just be better to roll with the punches. Luckily, not enough of our secret was divulged to discontinue our late November launch, and so we decided to post those videos on our blog.

Please keep in mind that, while many of the various steps were meant to be top secret, most of them can also be used to brew your own style of beer at home.

This process is known as steeping (just like with tea). We use a muslin bag to pour our secret blend of barley and malts, and steep it in the bag of boiling hot water for about 20-30 minutes.

Our master brewers then let the mixture of the water and spices boil over an open flame for about 30 minutes.

The top-secret syrup is then added to the hot water, and the brewers make sure it is slowly poured in while stirring slowly to ensure it dissolves. Then the mixture boils for another 60 minutes. By the way, I recognize that dog… I may have just figured out who leaked this video!

Then, 15 minutes before the hour of boiling is up, the master brewers add our bittering hops blend. After about 10 minutes, they then add flavoring hops to give it that extra Schlitz kick.

Following the boiling and adding of flavors, our brewers rapidly cool the mixture down to 80 degrees Fahrenheit in just 15 minutes to ensure all of the flavors are not boiled out.

Our mixture is then added to the fermenter along with water to make the complete brew. In this case, they added it to make 5 gallons of beer.

This is the final result of the first half of brewing. The mixture stays in this fermenter for up to 2 weeks. The thing at the top is called an airlock, and it tells is if the brew is starting to ferment correctly.

These are the videos that were leaked, but luckily nothing incriminating came out of it. Now we just have to hope that no other video gets leaked… I think it’s about time we find the owner of that dog!

Related Posts: Company Homebrew Competition, Brewery Buzz | Schlitz & Giggles

Related Posts: Company Homebrew Competition

0

Brewery Buzz | Schlitz & Giggles

Welcome to Schlitz & Giggles Brewery, your one-stop shop for everything Schlitz! Our brewery was founded in 2011 with one focus in mind: to brew good Schlitz that everyone would want. Thanks to the executives of the brewery, we are on our way to achieve that goal!

Meet the Executive Team

Our brewery was founded by some of the most fascinating and brilliant people on the planet, and we are lucky to have them as our leaders. No one knows beer like they do, and they put everything they have into making the best beer. Blood, sweat, and tears went into making every perfect brew (well, not literally… at least we hope not).


Lana Anderson

Growing up in the streets of Harlem, Lana’s childhood was atypical compared to the average American girl. She was raised by her parents, two retired black ops commanders, to be one of the best ninjas the world has ever seen. At age 14, she entered the Strongman Competition in South Africa and, after competing 3 straight days in a champion tug-of-war match, she came up victorious. She spent most of her adult life meditating in a dojo in South Korea, stopping only to eat, drink, and fight crime. To this day, her name still strikes fear into the minds of the world’s most notorious criminals… and squirrels.

 


Rudy Cantu

Rudy’s mysterious background prevents us from really knowing the man behind the hair, but here is what our contacts at the CIA were able to dig up. Legend has it that Rudy was raised by a pack of mangy wolves somewhere deep in the valleys surrounding the Weisshorn mountain of Switzerland. His upbringing forced him into a state of continuous alert and constant vigilance, allowing him to develop superhuman traits like 20/10 vision and the ability to leap 20 yards with little effort. Trained by the Columbian military at the ripe age of 11, Rudy became one of the most sought-after demolition experts in the Western hemisphere.

 


Jeff Kaller

Jeff is the definition of a “manly man.” Seriously, look it up. His picture is right next to the words “manly man” in Webster’s dictionary. Deep in the Everglades of southern Florida, Jeff, minutes after being born, went to work on building a log cabin for him and his family. The laborious project took all of 30 minutes to complete, and Jeff was sleeping in his own toddler suite by the end of the night. Growing up, he always got the ladies and it is rumored that he was unable to carry credit cards because his personality was so magnetic. School was a breeze for him: by 18 he was able to speak fluent French in Russian and his photographic memory is in HD.

 


Todd Miller

As a cryogenically frozen test tube baby, Todd was raised by the aboriginal Australian people on the outskirts of the Great Victorian Desert. By the age of 23, he was the first and only multi-sport athlete to win championships and MVP titles in the NBA, NFL, NHL, MLS, MLB, and WWE. As a runner, his world record speed for the 100 meter dash came in at 1.2 seconds – 23.3 seconds faster than the time he beat. During his teenage years, Todd spent his free time dabbling in various hobbies, including watercolors, basket weaving, and underwater shark fighting.

 


Darin Moore

One of the most intelligent men of the last 500 years, Darin’s keen intellect helped him in his childhood when he gained the highest honor at any higher education institution, a Doctorate in Brewery Science, at the age of 15. Working to invent several uses for his favorite liquid, he built and patented the beer-powered flying car in hopes of saving the world’s energy sources from depletion. At 21, he co-founded a secret government program called SNASA (Secret NASA) designed to launch the first American onto the surface of the moon (not the moon that everyone knows, but instead a secret moon that orbits the Earth invisible to the naked eye).

 

 

Related Posts: Company Homebrew Competition

0

Introducing The Holiday Five Pack

The Holiday Five Pack, if you’re not aware, is taken from the following Heineken commercial:

We are big fans of the advert and, since there are 5 of us, it made perfect sense for a team name. Holiday Five Pack consists of Melanie, Christine, Danielle, Linda and Titus.

Intimidated yet?

We knew from the beginning that we wanted to brew a dark beer because 1) the competition is being judged in December, so a light beer doesn’t work as well, and 2) Austin has hard water that gives off a slight bitterness and lends itself well to a dark brew. In the end, we chose to make a vanilla porter. Mmm.

The next step was to come up with a name for our beer. There were a few suggestions tossed around, including the clever “Pppporterface,” but Linda was dead set on including something relating to a wolf in the title. Why? We didn’t know for sure, but after we found this t-shirt at Austin Homebrew Supply, we knew it must be fate:

So we went back to the drawing board. Unfortunately, it seemed like every name we came up with was already taken. Howling Wolf? Taken.  Howling Wolf Mustache Beer? Taken. Obviously, we weren’t nearly as creative as we thought. We discussed the idea a bit more and decided the title should have some sophistication to it, then it came to us:

Image of the wolf was graciously provided by Jeremy of Sir Critter. It is only appropriate that he was inebriated when he came up with the idea. Thank you Jeremy. We hope to use the above image to print off labels for our bottles. Be sure to stay tuned for future posts on our brewing and bottling process. In the meantime, enjoy this gallery of our team photo shoot outtakes.

[nggallery id=3]

Related Posts: Company Homebrew Competition

0

Rainbow Ale Brewing Process

Team Rainbow Ale checking in here.  Our team includes Anthony, Michael, Kara and me, Scott.  We are making honey brown ale.  Michael chose this based on the description.  “Honey Brown is a full bodied American brown ale…”.  Mike thought it was perfect, since there are two full bodied American brown people on the team (Anthony and Scott, pictured center below).

Team Picture

Before we brewed, we went to Austin Home Brew to get the supplies, and learn the process. Check out the video Mike put together of that experience:

So, we brewed our beer last night, and that was an adventure, and I mean that in a good way.  Austin Home Brew sent us home with all of the supplies we would need to make the perfect Honey Brown.

Brewing Ingredients

As the video explains, first we get the water up to 155 degrees.  We just settled for boiling, and let it cool from there.  Then, we added the malt, which smelled of honey and chocolate.  Luckily, we had something to put it in, because I was thinking we were going to use an old stocking (yeah, pretty gross, but you do what you gotta do).  We let that soak for 25 minutes, dipping it like a tea bag every so often.  After that was done, we added what looked and tasted and smelled like molasses (not sure of the technical term, but I called it the tasty goodness).  We got that to a rolling boil, and then the fun began!  TIME TO ADD THE HOPS!!  The hops had a sweet, slightly fruity smell to them, and look like rabbit pellets.  So, we took half the hops, and added them in the beginning for bitterness.

This is when we ate dinner, thanks to Kara’s husband Justin.  He grilled hamburgers (AMAZING) and hot dogs (even fat free, for us full bodied American browns).

The Grill

After 45 minutes, we added half of what was left for flavoring.  10 minutes later, it was time to add the rest for aroma.

Now, the fun began.  The instructions were very specific about getting this brew to 80 degrees within 20 minutes.  So, we created an ice bath in the sink, and took the mixture (keep in mind, it was boiling) and put it in there.  And, we waited.  And waited.  And waited.  But, we forgot to set a timer, so it was unclear when 20 minutes were up.  I used the baseball game (Game 6 of the World Series) as a timer.  I figured 2 complete innings would be about 20 minutes.  It took almost that entire time to get it down to 80.

Cool Down

Then, we transferred the brew into the fermenting bucket and added 3 gallons of water.  After thoroughly mixing it, we tested the density, made sure it was correct, and put the lid on.  Now, putting on the lid proved to be a little more difficult than we initially realized.  I literally had to kneel completely on it to close the lid.  We thought we were all done, but WAIT!  Forgot to add the yeast (you know, that makes the alcohol, pretty important).  So, it was getting the lid off, another adventure, and then pouring the yeast in.  Now, in the brewing class, we learned that we are to sprinkle it evenly across the top.  But, yeah, that didn’t happen.  We just kind of put it in there.  We’ll see how that turns out…  The lid went back on (much easier this time), put the stopper and a little contraption that could be mistaken for a crack pipe into the stopper to allow the CO2 to escape.  And, voila!  Now, we are just letting it sit and ferment.  In two weeks, we will begin the bottling process.  SUPER GEEKED!!  So, that was our brewing adventure. Remember, when you are in the mood for a full bodied American brown ale, think….

Rainbow Ale LogoRelated Posts: Company Homebrew CompetitionTeam Rainbow Ale Introduction

0

Brew Ha Ha’s Brewing Process

Once we learned the basics at Austin Homebrew, it was time to do it ourselves. As previously stated, we chose the Imperial stout recipe. The brewing process was fairly simple and foolproof, from start to finish. The recipe was straightforward and step-by-step, allowing for an easy night of brewing. All the equipment was labeled and documented in a little pamphlet provided by AHB. The first step was to sterilize the stock pot, thermometer, and gigantic spoon. We visually inspected the equipment before sterilizing, but found no dirt or grime to clean. Earlier in the day, I took the hops and yeast out of the refrigerator to let them warm up.

Next it was time to bring the water 155˚F and then steep the grains. We added the grains to the boiling bag and let it sit in the water, periodically moving the bag up and down to really let the grains move through the water. We did this for about 26 minutes, and halfway through the aroma really began to waft through the kitchen.

Following the steeping process, we let the boiling bag drain excess water into the pot and then tossed the grains. The formerly clear water was now a dark black, so we were headed in the right direction. We added in some more water and began to bring the pot to a boil. With such a large amount of water it took about 30 minutes to bring to a full boil. Once it was at a continuous boil we added in the malt, which brought with it an overpowering, concentrated smell. The smell permeated through the entire house and it was almost enough to make one feel a little nauseous. Opening the kitchen window brought only a little relief. We let that sit for about 45-60 minutes, occasionally stirring so the syrup didn’t burn to the pot.

Once the malt was sufficiently dissolved and cooked, it was time to add the hops editions. The recipe only called for one packet of Chinook hops, scheduled to cook for 60 minutes, however a packet of Kent Golding hops had found its way into the ingredients bag. Not wanting to leave anything to chance, I called Austin Home Brew and they advised that it would be okay to just throw the unscheduled hops into the mix at about 5 minutes left in the scheduled hops cooking time. That was good enough for me and I did just that.

Next was the hardest part of the entire process – bringing the wort down to 80˚F in 20 minutes. We set up an ice bath in the sink and placed the pot inside. The ice would melt pretty quickly so we would constantly drain the water, add more ice, and repeat until the wort was cooled. Unfortunately, it took a little longer than 20 minutes so hopefully that doesn’t affect the end result too much.  While the hops were cooking we had sanitized the fermenting bucket. It was time to dump the wort and add the yeast. After adding the wort and water to bring the brew to the necessary 5 ¼ gallon level, I stirred vigorously to allow it to breath and then added the yeast. I placed the lid on the bucket to close it up and, after adding sanitizer, placed the air lock in its designated hole.

It only took about an hour for the CO2 to start making bubbles in the air lock, which was a comforting sight. Hopefully the rest of the process is as easy as the brewing portion. We will update you once we begin the secondary stage.

Check out our video of the process:

Related Posts: Company Homebrew Competition, Brew Ha Ha’s: Austin Home Brew Class #1

Page1 2 3